WORK INJURY LAWYER

You should be safe in your workplace. Unfortunately, some manufacturers of workplace machines place profits over safety, and some employers are more concerned with turning a profit than preventing on-the-job injuries. If you sustained a work injury or lost a loved one to a worksite accident, we may be able to help.

MACHINE INJURY

Workplace machines are often large and powerful, but unfortunately they are not always safe. Defective machines may lead to burns, falls, amputation, or even death.  Such cases call for a Georgia product liability lawyer.  For example, any employee who works with a machine is at risk of machine entanglement, which is when a piece of material gets caught in a rotating part and pulls someone into a machine. This type of accident is especially common in factories. Machine entanglement often results in accidental amputations, such as the loss of an arm or several fingers.  If a dangerous or defective machine caused your injury, you may need to pursue a personal injury or product liability claim.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970 lists hundreds of standards for protecting employees against injuries. 29 CFR 1910.212 specifically states that employers must use machine guards to prevent injuries. These guards must prevent the parts of a worker’s body from coming into contact with hazardous moving parts. If you suffered an injury at work, we may be able to help.

WORKPLACE FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS

On average, workplace explosions and fires injure approximately 5,000 workers each year. In 2012, more than 100 workers died as the result of explosions and fires. Explosions are more likely to occur in certain workplaces: mines, construction sites, manufacturing facilities, chemical plants, and worksites in the oil and gas industry. Most explosions occur when chemicals ignite, but even a build-up of dust inside a grain silo can trigger a serious accident.  These injuries can be very serious.

WORK INJURIES AND CONSTRUCTION SITES

As of December 2015, there were nearly 175,000 construction workers in Georgia, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Unfortunately, construction is one of the most dangerous industries in terms of worksite accidents. Construction workers are at risk for several types of injuries:

  • Falls from cranes, roofs, ladders, and scaffolding
  • Trauma from falling objects
  • Accidental amputations or crush injuries caused by equipment malfunction
  • Burns caused by explosions and fires
  • Serious injuries and fatalities resulting from building collapses
  • Crush injuries caused by being trapped between two large objects

WORK INJURY LAWS

OSHA has a lengthy set of standards for construction companies to follow, but not every employer complies with these regulations. Even if a company complies with OSHA standards, there is a risk of equipment malfunction or accidents caused by other workers. There are several issues to consider in a construction injury case, so it’s important to seek advice from an experienced attorney. Our law firm knows how to review the issues in your case and determine the best course of action for you and your family.

ELECTRICAL BURNS

Working with electrical equipment increases the risk for electrocution and chemical burns. There are several potential causes of electrical injuries on the job:

  • Contact with live power lines
  • Improper use of extension cords
  • Lack of ground-fault protection
  • Misuse of electrical equipment
  • Discontinuous or missing path to ground

29 CFR 1926.97 addresses the need for electrical protective equipment. There are also OSHA standards addressing electric power transmission and distribution, electric blasting, underground electrical installations, and protection from electric arcs. Unfortunately, some employers ignore the standards, while others don’t provide the training needed for workers to do their jobs in a safe manner.  Other times, the electrical machine or product may be defective, which could mean that you have a product liability case.

Many workers’ compensation settlements are too low to cover an injured employee’s medical expenses and make up for lost wages. If you sustained a serious injury in a worksite accident, you may be able to file a personal injury or product liability claim for your medical bills, pain and suffering, and loss of ability to work. This type of case is more complex, but it is what we do here at Butler Tobin.

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